Compagnia Opus Ballet

Compagnia Opus Ballet

Otello

About the Company

The Opus Ballet Company is directed by Rosanna Brocanello It is composed of a permanent nucleus of young professional dancers.  Evolving from the roots of modern dance in contemporary times, it offers a common language among genres, strong expressive impact and a high technical profile. Featuring multiple techniques and styles, through a group of extraordinary choreographers, artists and residencies to which the dancers with their great flexibility have constant access for limitless renewal open to experimentation.

For the last few years, the Company has received the support of the Tuscany Region and has presented its choreographies in important national and international contexts, receiving clear, significant acclaim from audiences and critics. Among its most important recent productions, “Swan Lake” – choreographies and direction by Loris Petrillo – and “Otello” – choreographies and direction by Arianna Benedetti – are continuing on tour since its debut in October 2012 to the present, followed with interest by some of the most important organizations, festivals, reviews and circuits on the theatre and dance panorama. Another Opus Ballet Company’s project is the international co-production with choreographies by Philippe Talard debuted in September 2014 at the Grand Théâtre de la Ville du Luxembourg. The last production is “Bolero and Gaité Parisienne” – choreographies and direction by Loris Petrillo – debuted in May 2016 at the Modena Community Theater’s. The Company supports the work of young choreographer-authors as well. Among others, it has produced the following works: “Where’s my self?, choreographies by Gustavo De Oliveira; “Jamais dire 2 sans toi” and “Too far so close”, choreographies by Aurelie Mounier, “Cap, pas cap…?” by Jari Boldrini and Martina Platina, “Recuerdos de una tabla” by and with Jari Boldrini. Since it was set up, the Opus Ballet Company has collaborated with a number of the most important Italian and international choreographers, among whom Vasco Wellenkamp, Patrick King, Peter Mika, Roberto Zappalà, Corinne Lanselle, German Jauregui and Loris Petrillo.

About the Piece

Past and present interweave, vibrate and recall us from Shakespeare’s lines to the present day and all the dramatic brutality of current events: Othello and Desdemona; certainly not history’s first “feminicide” but perhaps the most famous. Jealousy, possession turning pathological so that men claim the right to inflict death on their women, their victims.  So Desdemona, strong in that love to which she has dedicated herself, becomes the stage sacrificial victim and symbol of deliverance for other women who, united, find energy and strength enough both to retaliate and to hold their heads up high and look to the future.

But Desdemona’s rage is the rage of all women forced into helplessness by something as simple as a handkerchief, yet an object that may turn into an obsession, it may turn into a weapon or become the means to stop up the mouth and cause suffocation.  From the masculine viewpoint, at centre stage is the always present, physically tangible relation between Othello and Iago. An enigmatic character, the latter; becoming his own double through a highly effective stage device, he is the personification of evil one moment and of mere stupid human arrogance the next: one Iago clasps, envelops and finally possesses Othello’s mind, while the other, more physical and material, embraces him, speaks to him, shows him the body of his beloved possessed by others. Two figures for the same character who, throughout the play, merge miraculously to perform the ultimate deception. It is from the ever-present, ever-tangible comparison between the characters that the whole choreographic structure comes across: a research pathway on the interconnection and contamination of contemporary dance languages. The work on the body and on choreographic effect comes exactly within this research. On the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of the great Master from Busseto, this choreographic work wishes to add its tribute to Giuseppe Verdi by setting dance between the music and the sung word. The choice of music recalls different, opposing time levels: on the one hand the contemporary, heightened by electronic sound; on the other, Verdi’s music bursting suddenly, almost physically, across the stage, invading it utterly, possessing the dancers’ bodies and movements to achieve a result which is together contrast and fusion, purity and contamination.

Video

  • Type: Selected Companies
  • Prisma: 
  • Country of origin: Italia / Italy
  • Interpreted by: Borsi Desplan / Gabriele Vernich / Jennifer Rosati / Chiara Rontini / Camilla Bizzi / Michele Scappa / Gianmarco Martini Zani / Roberto Doveri / Chiara Mocci / Lorenzo Di Rocco

14oct8:00 pm11:00 pmOtelloOpus Ballet Company

  • Type: Selected Companies
  • Prisma: 
  • Country of origin: Italia / Italy
  • Interpreted by: Borsi Desplan / Gabriele Vernich / Jennifer Rosati / Chiara Rontini / Camilla Bizzi / Michele Scappa / Gianmarco Martini Zani / Roberto Doveri / Chiara Mocci / Lorenzo Di Rocco

14oct8:00 pm11:00 pmOtelloOpus Ballet Company

About the Company

The Opus Ballet Company is directed by Rosanna Brocanello It is composed of a permanent nucleus of young professional dancers.  Evolving from the roots of modern dance in contemporary times, it offers a common language among genres, strong expressive impact and a high technical profile. Featuring multiple techniques and styles, through a group of extraordinary choreographers, artists and residencies to which the dancers with their great flexibility have constant access for limitless renewal open to experimentation.

For the last few years, the Company has received the support of the Tuscany Region and has presented its choreographies in important national and international contexts, receiving clear, significant acclaim from audiences and critics. Among its most important recent productions, “Swan Lake” – choreographies and direction by Loris Petrillo – and “Otello” – choreographies and direction by Arianna Benedetti – are continuing on tour since its debut in October 2012 to the present, followed with interest by some of the most important organizations, festivals, reviews and circuits on the theatre and dance panorama. Another Opus Ballet Company’s project is the international co-production with choreographies by Philippe Talard debuted in September 2014 at the Grand Théâtre de la Ville du Luxembourg. The last production is “Bolero and Gaité Parisienne” – choreographies and direction by Loris Petrillo – debuted in May 2016 at the Modena Community Theater’s. The Company supports the work of young choreographer-authors as well. Among others, it has produced the following works: “Where’s my self?, choreographies by Gustavo De Oliveira; “Jamais dire 2 sans toi” and “Too far so close”, choreographies by Aurelie Mounier, “Cap, pas cap…?” by Jari Boldrini and Martina Platina, “Recuerdos de una tabla” by and with Jari Boldrini. Since it was set up, the Opus Ballet Company has collaborated with a number of the most important Italian and international choreographers, among whom Vasco Wellenkamp, Patrick King, Peter Mika, Roberto Zappalà, Corinne Lanselle, German Jauregui and Loris Petrillo.

About the Piece

Past and present interweave, vibrate and recall us from Shakespeare’s lines to the present day and all the dramatic brutality of current events: Otello and Desdemona; certainly not history’s first “feminicide” but perhaps the most famous. Jealousy, possession turning pathological so that men claim the right to inflict death on their women, their victims.  So Desdemona, strong in that love to which she has dedicated herself, becomes the stage sacrificial victim and symbol of deliverance for other women who, united, find energy and strength enough both to retaliate and to hold their heads up high and look to the future.

But Desdemona’s rage is the rage of all women forced into helplessness by something as simple as a handkerchief, yet an object that may turn into an obsession, it may turn into a weapon or become the means to stop up the mouth and cause suffocation.  From the masculine viewpoint, at centre stage is the always present, physically tangible relation between Othello and Iago. An enigmatic character, the latter; becoming his own double through a highly effective stage device, he is the personification of evil one moment and of mere stupid human arrogance the next: one Iago clasps, envelops and finally possesses Othello’s mind, while the other, more physical and material, embraces him, speaks to him, shows him the body of his beloved possessed by others. Two figures for the same character who, throughout the play, merge miraculously to perform the ultimate deception. It is from the ever-present, ever-tangible comparison between the characters that the whole choreographic structure comes across: a research pathway on the interconnection and contamination of contemporary dance languages. The work on the body and on choreographic effect comes exactly within this research. On the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of the great Master from Busseto, this choreographic work wishes to add its tribute to Giuseppe Verdi by setting dance between the music and the sung word. The choice of music recalls different, opposing time levels: on the one hand the contemporary, heightened by electronic sound; on the other, Verdi’s music bursting suddenly, almost physically, across the stage, invading it utterly, possessing the dancers’ bodies and movements to achieve a result which is together contrast and fusion, purity and contamination.

Video

Image Gallery

X
X